Category Archives: Anthropology and wheat consumption

That’s a mouthful!

This is the skull of a specimen of Homo sapiens recovered from the Fertile Crescent, specifically Qafzeh, Israel, and dated to around 100,000 years ago (photographed through glass, on display at London’s Natural History Museum). We don’t know the age … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology and wheat consumption, Dental health | 20 Comments

Hungry, naked, and desperate

Imagine yourself a primitive member of the Homo species: standing around 4 feet tall, nearly hairless, with limited ability to navigate the trees like the chimpanzees and other apes. You are virtually helpless against the vicious predators of the savannah–no … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology and wheat consumption | 33 Comments

Teeth and grains don’t mix

Lessons from examination of the Tyrolean Ice Man, Otzi, continue as his remains are sliced, examined, and scanned. We now learn that he had dental decay. See this National Geographic report: Leader of the Plaque: Iceman Otzi had Bad Teeth.: … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient forms, Anthropology and wheat consumption | 23 Comments

Anybody know a Neolithic dentist?

For over two million years, the Homo species has been a scavenger and gatherer, then a hunter and gatherer. Homo evolved from the Australopithecines in eastern Africa, east of the Great Rift Valley. Some 4 million years ago, 4-foot tall … Continue reading

Posted in Anthropology and wheat consumption, Dental disease, Dental health | 61 Comments