Exposing Flawed Logic: Wheat Belly And “Hammer Hands”

Hammer Hands Study

Read this incisive and insightful editorial on the Wheat Belly Lifestyle Institute website:

Hitting oneself in the hand with a rubber hammer reduces pain and swelling, human study finds

Author Gary Miller highlights the flawed logic used over and over and over again in nutrition studies:

Replace something bad with something less bad and the less bad thing must therefore be good.

It is part of the collection of epidemiological studies used to bolster the “healthy whole grain,” high-fiber, and low-fat fictions that have seized mainstream consciousness over the years, offering conclusions where none should be reached.

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Comments & Feedback...

  1. Janknitz

    I think people should continue to use steel hammers in moderation! There would be no need to switch to rubber hammers if you people would just exercise a little self control!

  2. Neicee

    Me to my mother: Everytime I do this it hurts! Waaay.
    Mother to me: Then stop doing it!
    Common sense will win out every time.

  3. Mike

    DR. DAVIS…PLEASE CLARIFY: An important question about meat. If we eat meat that is not “grass fed,” meaning the cattle has been fed grains, are you saying that we ingest the gluten and other harmful parts of the wheat, and if this is true, wouldn’t eating meat that is not grass fed cancel out the benetis of the Wheat Belly regimen?

    • I haven’t seen any indication that wheat fed to cattle ends up on your plate as wheat toxins to any hazardous degree. I’m willing to be mistaken. I do wonder about the glyphosate coming in with the corn feed.

      To me, the reasons for preferring grass-fed/grass-finished organic beef are:
      1. Much more favorable Omega3:6 ratio (CAFO critters are very low in O3).
      2. Much more favorable CLA (Conjugated Linoleic Acid).
      3. Much higher in key micronutrients B-vitamins, beta-carotene, vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), vitamin K, and trace minerals magnesium, calcium, and selenium.
      4. Much lower (or zero) antibiotics.
      5. Much lower (or zero) growth hormones.
      6. Depending on how you buy it, much lower risk of exposure to BSE.
      7. That open question about the RoundUp in your round up.

      Supposedly, the average American gets more antibiotics from meat than from the pharmacy. This presents two risks:
      a. it can screw up your gut biome (the next frontier in a sane human diet), and
      b. it breeds resistant bacteria (so don’t eat that CAFO meat rare)

        • I might add:
          8. organ meats vastly safer to consume

          Due to the inherent toxicity of standard feedlot feed (it’s fatal to the animals if they aren’t slaughtered on schedule), their livers are probably loaded with adverse stuff. Organic grass-fed/grass-finished beef liver is probably an excellent food.

  4. jack linden

    I got to admit hitting your hands with a hammer every day is crazy but so is smoking cigarettes and people do that as well.
    I have been wheat free for 10 months and have lost 11 pounds. I feel better but the weight loss stopped.
    A month ago I lost the battle to fight my hypertension and had to start Cozaar 50 mgs a day.
    It got the blood pressure down to normal but now it seems to have resulted in weight gain of 4 pounds.
    I know the mechanism of action of this drug is to block the renin/ angiotensin enzyme conversion in the kidney.
    There is an interplay with cortisol as well and I am concerned that my weight gain is from cozaar.
    Before I start switching medications I was wondering if you have any suggestions.
    I have watched your 3 part Utube video on losing the wheat but not the weight and have followed your
    suggestions.
    Could there be an issue with the cozaar?
    Any suggestions are appreciated..

    • Dr. Davis

      It would be uncommon, but it can happen. Perhaps an “idiosyncratic” reaction due to a unique genetic susceptibility.

      Sometimes the only way to relate cause and effect is to remove the suspected cause.

      • jack linden

        Dr Davis thanks for the quick response.
        I have decided to eliminate all dairy and will initiate kelp therapy to raise my iodine levels and hopefully combat any possible deficit that could be hindering my T4 to T3 conversion.
        My recent T4 free T3 and TSH were normal but the TSH may have been a little over 1.
        I don’t think I can stop the cozaar because I have been battling treatment for 2 years and the recent weight loss did not reverse the chronic vasoconstriction.
        I will tell you this fact: in the six months that I have been wheat free I did not have a single migraine !!!
        I now believe the trigger was gluten all along.
        I may go for the salivary cortisol analysis because my sleep patterns are poor because of my lifestyle ( taking call in the hospital every 4 nights, ugh)
        Thank you for helping me help myself .

        • Dr. Davis

          Yes, once you start to open your eyes to adrenal dysfunction, it seems to be an exceptionally common condition, especially in odd schedules such as yours.

  5. And then every once in while someone runs a very telling trial; this from last week …

    “A Randomized Pilot Trial of a Moderate Carbohydrate Diet Compared to a Very Low Carbohydrate Diet in Overweight or Obese Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus or Prediabetes”
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3981696/

    The results were exactly what we’d expect, and the ADA is going to have to hand-wave quite furiously to distract people.