Diabetes: “Cured by Wheat Belly”

Take a look at Mary’s story posted on the Wheat Belly Blog:

I used to be diabetic. Now I am not. Cured by Wheat Belly.

Fasting blood sugar less then 87 mg/dl consistently. Postprandial [after-meal] readings at one hour at 100 mg/dl or less. HbA1c 5.5.

No dietician can tell me any lies about wheat or proper carb intake. I struggled for 10+ years following ADA [American Diabetes Association] diet guidelines. I gained 15+ pounds. I walked 15 miles a week at training heart rate.

I stopped all that nonsense because it only produced higher and higher blood sugar numbers, even on metformin and with exercise. Something was obviously wrong and I knew it wasn’t my laziness or overindulgence. It was the horrendous advice that was killing me!

Now I avoid carbs with the same dilgence that I avoid dieticians and doctors/nurses who give ADA advice. It doesn’t work and it never will. More people are diagnosed with diabetes and/or obesity every year. And with so many dieticians with such rock-solid advice? Hmm . . . Maybe it’s the dieticians who are propelling people to diabetes and obesity. That was certainly the case for me.

Thanks, Mary. Isn’t that wonderful? And, by saying goodbye to wheat, she has done more than “just” lose the diabetes, of course.

Let’s be clear on this: Grains and sugars CAUSE type 2 diabetes. Wheat is the worst of all grains and therefore wheat causes diabetes. (Wheat also causes type 1 diabetes, by the way, an entirely different, though VERY disturbing, conversation.) Let us count the ways:

1) The amylopectin A “complex” carbohydrate of wheat, given its unusual susceptibility to digestion by the salivary and stomach enzyme, amylase, raises blood sugar to sky-high levels. You know my line: Two slices of whole wheat bread raise blood sugar higher than 6 teaspoons of table sugar. (And, no, it does NOT mean eat white bread!)

2) High blood glucose damages the delicate pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin, a process called “glucotoxicity.”

3) Following consumption of highly-digestible carbohydrates, such as the amylopectin A of wheat, the process of liver de novo lipogenesis causes a flood of triglyceride-rich liver lipoproteins like VLDL particles to enter the bloodstream. This damages the pancreatic beta cells, a process called “lipotoxicity.”

4) Repetitive high blood sugars, such as that developing after a diet rich in “healthy whole grains,” via an uncertain cascade of events, leads to insulin resistance, that places greater demand on the pancreas to produce more insulin.

5) Insulin resistance triggers the accumulation of visceral fat: muffin top, love handles, or wheat belly.

6) Visceral fat is inflammatory fat that worsens insulin resistance.

The above are well documented. Less well documented but potentially just as important: The combined action of the gliadin protein of wheat and the lectin protein, wheat germ agglutinin, are directly toxic to the pancreas, as well as to the gastric/duodenal signaling apparatus for pancreatic endocrine/exocrine function.

In short: wheat consumption = diabetes. Accordingly, no wheat often means no diabetes. Key: Lose the wheat before it’s too late. Pancreatic beta cells for the most part do not regenerate once destroyed. If you have only 70% residual beta cell function remaining, for instance (VERY common), do it now or else the diabetes is irreversible.

It makes Novo Nordisk, Novartis, and Sanofi Aventis very happy when you have incurable type 2 diabetes. Note that the great majority of people on diabetes drugs–responsible for double-digit revenue growth in these diabetes drug manufacturers, recession be damned!–are taking them for a reversible, curable disease. People have heart attacks, develop breast cancer, have strokes, and undergo amputations of limbs and go blind . . . from this reversible disease.

The American Diabetes Association continues to advise diabetics to eat more “healthy whole grains” and to follow a diet that is dominated (60%+ of calories) by grains. They are nicely assisted in their cause by Novo Nordisk, Novartis, and Sanofi Aventis, not to mention Cadbury Schweppes, the world’s largest candy and soft drink manufacturer.

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Comments & Feedback...

  1. Ruthanne Hayes

    About 6 weeks ago, I gave up wheat and anything made with wheat and it seems to have cured my flare up of ulcerative colitis that since November has been resistant to medications, including a long miserable course of prednisone. It may sound drastic, but for me it’s helped a lot. Life changing, really. And I effortlessly lost 14lbs too….always a plus. The other really good thing is…I really don’t miss it and am not going around hungry all the time. My BMI is a healthy 22% now and I can’t wait for my next physical in March to see my new lab work values.

    • Dr. Davis

      Excellent, Ruthanne!

      So why didn’t your gastroenterologist suggest wheat elimination as the first default strategy?

  2. How does this factor in to the equation? Carb consumption increased because we were told to also cut fat from the diet, particularly saturated animal fats. Are these not also essential building blocks for things like hormones and therefore insulin. Double edged insult. By cutting fats you invoke all the above noted metabolic insults which are then exacerbated by not giving the body the raw materials necessary to naturally synthesize the very thing (insulin) needed to deal with the additional burden thus making it a win win for the industrial food and pharma industries. I know this might be implied in the discussion but to me it just seems to help make the picture even clearer.

  3. steve

    Doc
    It’s probably a fact that eating wheat causes untold health issues, my suspicions, and notable others whom have lost the wheat, and other grains, that this is evident with the results of healthy functioning bodies, with a lot of these health issues slowly disappearing. (My observation over the period of many years doc). The intentions of modern day doctors, dieticians, scientist, etc.at one time were honorable in trying to find cures. But as time when by the very obvious was happening, diabetes, obesity, cancer is out of control, and the real bonus here doc is, it’s a money making scheme. The sicker the person the more drugs, hospital care, etc. I think doc you get my point. Now back to me, I have serious health problem, eyes, borderline diabetes, high blood pressure and prostate problems. That’s just the tip of the iceberge, since giving up wheat, grain, refined sugars, and changing what fuel i ingest, these problems have almost disappeared, except, my left eye, the damage is probably permanent.
    Now if i hadn’t gone wheat free, the probability of me being a ward of the state, hospital, drug therapy was a given. Doc your timely book wheat belly is probably the break through of the century. I hope this helps and inspires others to follow a wheat free lifestyle.

    Steve

    • Dr. Davis

      Yup, Steve: It’s a fact, alright!

      You can see why it is no exaggeration when I say that wheat is the perfect chronic poison. It is NOT just about weight loss. It is about the head-to-toe destruction of health.

  4. Bryna

    Can someone give me a clarification, please?

    I thought two pieces of whole wheat bread raised blood sugar higher than 2 tsp. of table sugar. But I read on this blog post, 6 tsp. table sugar. Is it 2 tsp. or 6 tsp.? I just want to get these small facts straight so as I’m educating people, I have lots of valid details. (My family especially will need to hear all the details I can throw at them so it will be difficult to change their mindset).

    Thanks!

    • Bryna

      Whoops! Never mind. I looked at my Wheat Belly book again and saw it’s 2 TBSP (or 6 tsp) of table sugar. Disregard my question everyone! :)

    • Yang Tjew

      Two pieces of whole wheat bread raises blood sugar higher than 2 Tbsp. of sugar.
      1 Tbsp. (tablespoon) equals 3 tsp. (teaspoon). 1 Tbsp. equals 14.8ml (often rounded to 15ml) and 1 tsp. equals 4.93ml (often rounded to 5ml.)

      So we can also say two pieces of whole wheat bread raises blood sugar higher than 6 tsp. of sugar.

      • John Blatz

        Regarding blood glucose levels, I once read that consuming certain foods together pretty much eliminates spikes that would happen with the carb alone, such as spaghetti with olive oil, or rice with vinegar (as in sushi). Is there any truth to that? Thanks.

        • Dr. Davis

          No, it’s nonsense, John.

          For instance, two slices of whole wheat bread: blood sugar 167 mg/dl.

          Two slices of whole wheat bread with several slices of ham, mayonnaise, and cheese: blood sugar 150 mg/dl–better, but still pretty awful.

      • Marie Garrett.

        Hi Boundless:
        Like Marilyn I also have questions. I am fairly new at this new way of eating & would like some help with getting it all figured out. When Dr. Davis says to try to keep carbs to around 40 a day, does that mean I can eat all of the food in the unlimited quantities list I want and just have to count the carbs in the rest of the food I eat that day?
        Thanks Marie

        • Boundless

          Count “net carbs” from everything.
          Net carbs is total carbs minus fiber carbs.
          The WB unlimited foods tend to be pretty low in both.

          • Marie Garrett.

            Thanks, not doing as well as i thought with counting carbs. Back to the drawing board(carb counter) for me.

      • JIllOz

        “Scientific horror story with recipes”!! LOL

        It’s the downfall of Western civilisation!
        Bbut it’s OK!!
        We have snacks!! :)

        • Boundless

          The Wheat Belly book is like a Michael Crichton novel about science spinning out of control, except:
          * it’s not fiction;
          * it’s not by Michael Crichton; but,
          * it might be about what killed Michael Crichton.

          So it’s more like “The Hot Zone”, except:
          * it’s not over;
          * you’re in the Level 4 lab; and,
          * you’re the monkey.

    • Yang Tjew

      Everything except wheat or wheat containing foods (bread, pasta, pastry, pizza, cookies, etc.)

      You can eat: any type of meat (beef, pork, chicken, fish, oysters, shrimp, bison, venison, mutton, ostrich, emu, lobster, turkey, etc), any type of dairy product (cheese, milk, yogurt, butter; watch out for yogurts loaded with sugars), any type of vegetable (cucumbers, spinach, broccoli, etc.; you know if it’s vegetable when you see one. Potatoes and starch root veggies in limited quantites), any type of fruit (sugary fruits such grapes and bananas in limited quantities), any type of egg, any type of legume (beans, soy, etc. in limited quantites), any type of nut (pecans, almonds, walnuts, cashews, etc.; remember peanuts are not nuts but legumes). Olives, avocadoes, coconuts and their oil products can be consumed in large quantities. Butter and butter sauces such as bernaise sauce, hollandaise sauce and mayonaise are good for reducing hunger although you’d be better off making your own sauce as store bought ones contains soybean oil or canola oil. Seeds such as sunflower seeds, sesame, pumpkin seeds and chia are chockful of antioxidants and minerals. You can also eat wheat-free candies such as chocolate and lollipops in very limited quatity. Certain grains such as rice, amaranth, and buckwheat can be eaten in limited quantities. Unfortunately buckwheat pasta/noodles are often mixed with wheat. It’s best to stay away from grains as they can spike your blood sugar in no time flat.

      If I were to list each individual food item, it’s quite a large list. It can look daunting to live without eating wheat however as you progress through a wheat-free diet you’ll see that the benefits FAR outweigh the minor inconveniences. Who in their right mind would want to eat wheat and increase his/her likelihood of experiencing headaches, IBS, mysterious joint pains, brain fog, tiredness, high blood sugar, constipation, skin rashes, visceral fat accumulation, moobs, bleeding gums, depression, etc.?

  5. I have maintained for many years that so-called Type II Diabetes is completely preventable and reversible. I have successfully avoided the chronic high blood sugar that is called “Type II” with a 13-year and counting low-carb diet. My brother and sister both began life-carb lifestyles at the same time as I did. My brother has also had great success avoiding the fate that befell our father and grandfather. However, my faith in low-carb, wheat-free diets is being seriously tried by my sister’s inability to reverse her “Type II” which was diagnosed just before we all swapped our high-carb, low-fat diets for what we learned was the appropriate course for our metabolic issues. in our case, I firmly believe that the insulin resistance is genetic and the “pre-existing condition” that leads to diabetes in those who consume excess carbohydrate. My sister was particularly damaged by the conventional diet, as she struggled with her weight all of her adult life. She followed a strict Weight Watchers diet and walked 4 to 5 miles a day for 3 months, gained 10 pounds, and got her “diabetes” diagnosis. What is so frustrating is that she is trying so hard to use a low-carb diet to control her blood sugar, but her readings are getting progressively worse. Her last HbA1C was 10 – which is astronomically high and very frightening. Her highest sugars are fasting and can be as high as 300. They drop during the day and she says that eating the same meals can result in vastly different readings. She takes metformin and has taken Jenuvia, but is not taking insulin, although her doctor is strongly pushing her to start insulin. I would assume she still makes insulin, as she still has a lot of abdominal fat. She has not had any success with weight loss from low-carb, wheat-free either. What is going on here? She went to see Mary Vernon who had nothing to offer but the low-carb diet she is already following. We are completely mystified and frightened for her. She will do anything – but is getting pretty desperate.

    • lupo

      I assume that Mary Vernon checked for a number of pitfalls in low-carb nutrition. Some people stall their weight loss and their remission from diabetes with nuts, dairy or even plant-based oils. The only thing I would go for and try is a fully ketogenic diet,. This means eating less than 10-20 grams of calories from carbohydrate per day, a fixed amount of protein, the rest is saturated and monounsaturated fat (think: eggs, bacon, butter and water). While this is a serious dietary intervention, let her think about it. It needs to be carefully guided by a skilled physician, as her simultaneous Metformin/Sitagliptin medication may drive her into temporary yet possibly severe lactacidosis under such a dietary regime.
      Peggy, your sister is not lost yet. Not all possible treatments were yet exhausted. I hope her beta cells are still fit enough if she makes a recovery…

      • My sister’s doctor is a rural Nebraska small town doc who means well, but follows very conventional diabetes treatment. Mary Vernon was truly no help at all. She spent very little time with my sister, who had to drive a considerable distance and stay in a hotel to see Dr. Vernon. Follow-up was very difficult. A very bad experience which has left us with an unfortunately negative opinion of Vernon.
        I am on a ketogenic diet, as is my significant other who is a retired Family Physician and also completely baffled as to why her BS readings are getting higher and higher as her carb intake is being continually reduced. It is my understanding that my she, with our advice, is following a ketogenic diet, eating exactly what we do, which is basically egg yolks cooked in butter or coconut oil, salt pork or uncured bacon, well-marbled steaks, salad, and veggies with butter or olive oil. We have counseled her to eat plenty of fat and to limit her protein intake. I know that she really doesn’t like the food she is eating, but is trying so hard to deal with her blood sugar. I will see if she is eating nuts or seed oils. She is a very disciplined person and says she will try anything.
        My sister is more the type to do what a doctor says than I am, and feels the medications help. She also takes a beta blocker which we’ve encouraged her to drop, but she is convinced she will have terrible migraines without it.

        • lupo

          This is a little bit of a mystery. Does she track her ketones through stix or a blood ketone meter? Was she checked for an “in the closet” type I diabetes by measuring antibodies? Anything on her vitamin status? When she takes beta blockers, there’s more to her medical history than “just” diabetes…

        • Dr. Davis

          Several possibilties, Peggy:

          1) If weight loss is occurring, it will temporarily prevent blood sugars from dropping. They will drop once weight loss subsides.

          2) Excess cortisol–from the adrenal gland. It’s like taking prednisone.

          3) An uncontrolled postprandial lipoprotein disorder–this gets complex. Something like apo E2 or a chylomicron disorder. This requires someone pretty savvy to diagnose.

          4) Hypothyroidism–VERY, VERY common. A TSH, free T3, free T4, and reverse T3 are in order.

          There are other possibilities, but the above list likely covers at least 90% of the possibilities.

          • Thanks. These are good ideas, but raise more questions:
            1. No weight loss. She has been very unsuccessful with weight loss attempts all of her life. 13 years low-carb, and she has not been gaining, but she has not lost much weight over the 13 years.
            2. I have considered cortisol as the issue. How does one know and how does one lower cortisol levels if that is the cause?
            3.Where do we find this “savvy” person? This could very well be the answer, but who do we turn to? As I have reported, we thought Mary Vernon would consider and investigate these more complicated possibilities, and she did nothing.
            4. Thyroid was a bit low – will be retested at her next primary care appointment.
            For those of you who are suggesting she is “a closet Type I:”
            If she were Type I, wouldn’t her blood sugar be much higher and wouldn’t she be skinny as a rail with no insulin in her body? And remember at has been 13 years since diagnosis, How could she still be alive without insulin? I really don’t think she is late-onset Type I. “Type II” is rampant in our family..

          • Dr. Davis

            Sadly, there is no sure-fire way to identify an able practitioner. You might start with a functional medicine practitioner or naturopath, however: Your best bets.

            Cortisol is best assessed by obtaining 4 salivary samples throughout the day. There are ready-made kits for doing just this and it’s very simple.

            Thyroid just “a bit low” is enough to impair weight loss and double or triple cardiovascular MORTALITY–this is no small matter. It should be made a priority.

            I think they mean the more “in-between” type of diabetes, not altogether type 1 but not altogether type 1 with some residual capacity to produce insulin, but much reduced. Once again, you need the services of somebody smart about such things and it is unlikely to be an endocrinologist, a generally useless breed of human.

        • nonegiven

          Your sister needs to be on insulin, sooner rather than later. She can always drop the dose later, if she can get better control, but if you’re having 300mg/dl on low carb, insulin always works.

        • darMA

          Don’t forget that wheat destruction can differ from body to body. Her pancreas may have taken more of a beating than yours or your other sibling’s. Also, have they tested to make sure she is really a Type II? I’ve seen on some of the diabetic forums that it was only after all oral meds, diet and exercise were failing that they finally tested the person and found they were actually late onset T1’s and naturally in that case only insulin will help. I do hope she finds the correct answers.

          • Uncle Roscoe

            It’s called latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA). I have it. I treat it with diet, and my symptoms are gone. What does this mean? It doesn’t mean I can ingest the sweets and opioids I did as a child. That would either make me very sick or kill me. It means I have to stay away from all of the volatile sugars and opioids which raise blood sugar and cause autoimmune responses. I don’t take insulin because I don’t need insulin. My blood sugar is under control.

            I agree that LADA usually gets misdiagnosed as type 2. Both can be treated by diet. But LADA doesn’t give quarter for “cheats” or accidents. Type 2 can often be treated by eliminating the worst of the sugars and opioids, like the ones in wheat. LADA can’t. I’ve had to identify all of my triggers and totally abstain from ingesting them.

          • Dr. Davis

            I’m impressed, Uncle!

            I’ve often wondered (no proof, just speculation) if LADA is also, like type 1, a form of wheat-induced autoimmunity, a pancreatic effect wrought by wheat gliadin.

  6. JoAnne

    My John Q primary doctor said I had no sign of diabetes since my fasting glucose was 78….. even though my HbA1c was 5.8 (pre-diabetic). So I got a glucose meter. I’d purposely eat something like rice, corn, or potatoes and limit it to 1/2 cup serving. And then watch my fasting blood sugar of 90 mg/dl skyrocket 42 points to a one-hour postprandial of 132 mg/dl. I went wheat-free 7 months ago; and that cleared up health problems I didn’t even know I had until I realized they were gone! I now avoid carbs since I began using the glucose meter. Thanks to you, Dr Davis, I’m taking a detour OFF the road to diabetes! I’ve learned so much from what you post and from others who share their experiences.

    My numbers jump around. I don’t understand the ranges I can get between the fasting and postprandial reading. Sometimes there’s a 10 point spread, other times a 5 point spread, and a few times it’s gone down. Here are some actual readings:
    Fasting 85 Postprandial 96
    Fasting 89 Postprandial 90
    Fasting 88 Postprandial 84
    Fasting 82 Postprandial 79

    Why does this happen or am I doing something wrong?
    I am happy to say I never go over 100 mg/dl on the postprandial reading. Your explanation would be so helpful.

    • lupo

      JoAnne, a one-hour postprandial of 132mg/dl is not really that serious. First of all, blood glucose meters have a tolerance of +/- 15%. The readings are really close to each other.
      I have observed the same. I assume that there is residual carbohydrate (milk -> lactose, meat -> glycogen) or this is some hormonal effect. Maybe some small amounts of glucagon that are always secreted from the pancreas when one eats and digests.
      At least you don’t have worry, all these readings are *far* away from anything that puts you at risk.

      If you are statistically inclined, search the Web for the Quantified Self concept, measure everything and do the math to find out whether you’re dealing with an artifact or a physiological effect.

    • Dr. Davis

      You are doing the right thing, JoAnne!

      I advise two things to people using their 1-hour postprandial readings to construct a perfect diet for ideal health:

      1) Either allow NO CHANGE pre- to 1-hour post-meal, or
      2) Don’t allow the 1-hour post-meal to exceed 100 mg/dl.

      The standard advice to allow, say, 140 mg/dl after eating is nonsense. It will cause weight gain especially in visceral fat, the phenomena of glycation, cataracts, arthritis, heart disease, and cancer. This is what the primary care and endocrine community advise, since it means you don’t “need” drugs “yet.” Yeah, I’d like to lock them in a big closet and throw away the key, too!

    • Marv

      JoAnne,

      Also remember that consumer glucose meters are just screening tools; they’ll tell a diabetic if they need to go to the hospital but won’t tell you if your sugar is 89 versus 86 very well.

      I bought the highest-rated meter in a “Consumer Reporting” magazine and did three tests from the same hand one after the other. Plus or minus 10 points is good for one of these, and I’m pretty sure my pinky ate the same thing as my ring finger.

      You can still see what foods spike your sugar – just don’t look for exactness.

  7. I stopped eating bread and pasta for the past 3 months and my HbA1c improved remarkably!
    From a high of 11.70, it is now down to 7.20. I am very near my goal of 6.07 or lower.
    And all my other test results (Cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, VLDL, FBS) are in the normal range!
    I am very glad my sister from Canada recommended the Wheat Belly book to me because it has changed my life.
    Some friends of mine have the adapted the wheat-free lifestyle. They said, I inspired them to want to have a healthier and better quality of life.
    Thank you, Dr. Davis for sharing this amazing gift to all of us.

    • Dr. Davis

      Excellent, Lia! You accomplished what is usually accomplished with 2 or 3 diabetes drugs, including high doses of insulin–with NO drugs!

      However, if IDEAL health is your goal, not just avoidance of drugs, then getting your HbA1c to 5.0% or less is required. Have you normalized your vitamin D blood level? That REALLY helps. If that photo on the blog is you, you look like a smaller person. Smaller people usually require around 4000 units per day in gelcap form to generate a normal blood level.

      • Dear Dr. Davis,
        Yes! Ideal health is my goal so I plan to make my HbA1c even lower. I know I can do it! I am so positive because now I am a wheat belly advocate!
        I will ask my doctor about my Vitamin D blood level so I can address that problem also.
        Again… thank you so much Dr. Davis! Will update you as soon as I reach the 5.0 level of my HbA1c result.
        Lia

  8. Jenny

    Here is a research study regarding reversal of diabetes by using calorie restriction of 600 cal for 8 weeks. The study participants consumed Optifast (which is primarily non-fat dry milk powder) and non-starchy vegetables. The researchers attributed the restoration of normal pancreatic function to the calorie restriction. Could it be because of wheat elimination instead?

    http://www.diabetologia-journal.org/Lim.pdf

    • Dr. Davis

      It’s probably both, though I suspect that the loss of wheat was the dominant factor.

      Ever try eating 600 calories per day? It is absolute torture.

  9. Birgit

    Thanks for clarifying that wheat also causes type 1 diabetes. I assume this has to do with the immune response of the human body to modern wheat.
    I just watched the movie “Genetic Roulette” about GMO foods, and it looks like some of the bacteria that are inserted into plants to kill weeds may be able to multiply in the human gut even years after ingesting the GMO foods, causing leaky gut and a host of autoimmune diseases. I’m hoping to learn more about that.
    Of course the FDA seems to have been involved in a huge coverup of the dangers and letting Monsanto have their way without testing any new GMO’s.

    Birgit

    • lupo

      Excuse me, but in GMO, its not bacteria that are inserted into other species, it is bacterial genes. This is a huge difference. It will not multiply in the human gut. It may have damaging properties, yes, but that has to be evaluated on a per-case basis.
      That said, I don’t see any reason why one should eat genetically modified food, when ten thousands of years of natural food were perfectly fine for our ancestors.

      • Neicee

        I don’t care how the finished product is made. But, I do not want to consume any product by Monsanto’s GE Roundup Ready grains. Soybeans were the first modified in 1996, followed by alfalfa, corn, cotton (cottonseed oil anyone?), winter and spring canola, and now sugarbeets. If you’ve ever used Roundup in your gardens you’ll never use a grain nor oil made from those items. As far as feed for cattle/pigs/chickens I’m searching everywhere where they can guarantee the feed for those livestock were not Roundup Ready! How about the poor farmer trying to raise a few acres of organic produce? The wind blows and his crop is counter planted with the evil grains too. If testing show this then I’m guessing he could lose his organic certification?

    • Dr. Davis

      Yes. See the chapter on diabetes in the Wheat Belly book, as well as a blog post here from a few months back.

      This is one of the most disturbing aspects of the entire wheat question.

    • Rong

      Ah, yes scientific consensus. It’s nonsense! There was a consensus that blood letting was good along with electro-shock, lobotomy and many, many other wonderful things. Beware of consensus especially when it’s used as a justification in science. It’s always the outliers that develop the new things that advance mankind not those that keep a strangle hold on dogma.

    • Neicee

      Earlier this morning I did my normal perusal of the http://www.newsmaxhealth.com page. They referenced a study out of Australia on sugar and the results they claimed were that those registering high sugar levels (not pre or confirmed diabetics) all showed signs of brain shrinkage. I think I’ll just stick with my stevia/truvia per Dr. Davis’ advice.

      • JIllOz

        Dr Davis, at least you know where you are with a bagel. ;)
        It’ll raise your blood sugar but, in light of your book’s info, it’s not disguised as health food.
        But it seems that various health “professionals” either don’t know what they are doing or have a very curious breakdown of knowledge or disconnect.

        I suspect that’s because few of them are actually trained scientists, they are just told in their training that what they are being trained with is scientifically based.

  10. I was pre-diabetic, liver was turning to mush–and a host of other symptoms, to include hard belly fat.

    I was killing myself to lose weight, without losing the wheat, as I was fighting a poision [wheat], going against my bodie’s physiology–went from 297 to 205–and balloned back up to 270, until I lost the wheat. Now, even at a heavier weight, I do not have the physical symptoms that I had, with my first weight loss–as this weight loss, now, will get me to 190lbs–and I have no fears of the weight comming back on me, this time, with a vengence! No! Now I understand how the body works, and I know why I have had most of my nearly 49.5 years of misery!

    After all my years of sudy, independent and formal–I was not able to understand how the body actually works, and its relationship to man-altered grains, until Wheat Belly. Dr. Davis has made it clear, how the body actually works–or does not work, depending on one’s consumption of altered grains, especially wheat.

    I was at a stand-still, (platau?) with my weight loss–though I was happy with the 40 lbs. I lost.

    Now, I am losing, again, at a steady pace–as I am adding suplemets, such as extra D, Calcium, Potassium, Magnesium, Kelp (iodine) Chromium and fresh Veg. juices and limited fruit juices. Since 1 Mar. 2012, I have been faithul to no-grain–and cannot beleive the benefits–as my Service Connected Injuries are more bearable!

    All one has to do, is read and understand Wheat Belly, take notes, visit this site, and learn off this site, if there are things one does not understand.

    Keep following Wheat Belly, This Site and Dr. Davis’s Lead–

    Health will come, along with weight loss!

    Roger, Ohio

    • Neicee

      Roger, good to see you back commenting. Everyday I learn something new about this journey we’re all travelling together.

    • Dr. Davis

      Hey, Roger!

      I believe that your health will be like a fine Bordeaux wine: You will get better and better as time passes!

    • JIllOz

      Roger,

      I really hope you can get in touch with fellow vets and help them in their recovery from various conditions. It is my understanding that vets are among the people for whom little help is available, and the hep that is there is very expensive.
      At least it doesn’t cost anything to go wheat-free, and who knows what benefits they might get!!

  11. Rong

    Just trolling or really concerned? Probably the former but just in case… The arguments made for the Wheat Belly way is not to prevent celiac although it certainly helps with that it is way beyond that. Personally, I ran 3-5 miles a day for 25 years and ate exactly what I was told by the folks at most of the big organizations like the diabetes org. Very low fat, lots of “healthy whole grains” and veggies little or no red meat. For all my discipline, I gained 30 pounds had triglycerides as high a 900 and usually 300 or higher, had high cholesterol and low HDL along with a nice new case of Type II diabetes. I finally tried Atkins and had remarkable results with far less exercise. I reversed all my blood work problems except I still had too high fasting glucose as well as high A1C.

    Now that I am grain free, with my large and prominent “tin foil hat”, I have very low triglycerides, my HDL is higher that my LDL and my total cholesterol is 135. Oh, yeah, my A1C is 5.5 my fasting blood sugar is 88 and I am getting off metformin that I have been on for about 10 years. Am I cured? You be the judge. I no longer have symptoms of Type II so I will continue to do as I am. We can argue of semantics of cured or not but if I can avoid the symptoms of diabetes by eliminating grains who the hell cares?

    • Neicee

      Jason, I would just love for a naysayer to please provide a link to prove you absolutely must have grains of any variety and/or starchy vegetables. You can get the same vitamins and minerals from other things. But, if someone chooses to be sub-par in their eating habits, far be it from me to try and convince them. Not only diabetes is at play here, and I commend anyone that thinks they’re healthy eating according to the ADA…..if a cure for diabetes exists, or can be found, the ADA would lose their donations and funding by numerous contributors. Same goes for every other research group out there. If I were the head of any of them I’d certainly tout the poor eating recommendations they all do. Lot’s more $$$$$. Who cares if a few thousand a year die from the complications?

  12. I have been trying to tell dieticians this for years. Sugar and starches are the most common cause of this terrible disease that can EASILY be cured!
    Having a dash of cinnamon in the morning will help with blood sugar, but only to a certain degree.

    Cody

  13. Jason

    Did y’all really reply to my message? I don’t see mine posted. I’m not saying anyone has to eat Wheat. In fact if it’s better for someone not too great. But I’m seeing a few things that don’t ring true for me. A claim that the ADA recommends 60% of calories from whole grains. Maybe they used to but they don’t now.

    Feel free to explain to me how I have had the exact same results as Mary with lowering A1C, lowering weight 90 pounds, when I follow the ADA diet. Regardless if you think it’s healthy or not it’s solved all my digestive problems of constipation, gerd, acid reflux, all gone. Seems likely that some people can’t handle wheat and others can. But why put a blanket statement that it’s bad for everyone? Everything I have read here indicates I should be gaining weight and my numbers should be going up instead of down.

    • Dr. Davis

      No, Jason: I deleted your message because it was rude and abusive.

      While I invite controversy, I do not tolerate things like “you are stupid” or “you’re an asshole.” Do that someplace else.

      I fear you are enjoying a honeymoon effect of a diet change, a common effect, for instance, in converting to a low-fat diet. The problem is that it does not last. Were you to assess metabolic markers such as HbA1c, fasting glucose, c-reactive protein, and lipoproteins for percent small LDL particles, you will likely see the disaster you have created but are not perceiving.

      Any more abusive comments will not make it to the light of day.

      • Jason

        I apologize if I was rude or offensive in my first post. I certainly don’t remember calling anyone “stupid” or an “asshole”. If I did I regret that.

        Please show me where the ADA recommends a diet of 60% or greater in grains.

        What you say they teach is not what I experienced going through diabetes education classes. I’ll be open minded to what you have to say. But I am turned off at presenting them as something they were not with me.

        • Boundless

          > Please show me where the ADA recommends a diet of 60% or greater in grains.
          That’s a misquote, and imprecise as well. The article above says: “(60%+ of calories)”.
          The calories per gram are different for fat, protein and carb.
          I wasn’t able to quickly find a proportional breakdown on the ADA site, but here are some quotes from wiki:
          Topic: diabetic diet
          “The American Diabetes Association in 1994 recommended that 60–70% of caloric intake should be in the form of carbohydrates. As mentioned above, this is controversial, with some researchers claiming that 40%[9] or even less is better, while others claim benefits for a high-fiber, 75% carbohydrate diet.”
          Topic: carbohydrate
          “…the Institute of Medicine recommends that American and Canadian adults get between 45–65% of dietary energy from carbohydrates.[14] The Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization jointly recommend that national dietary guidelines set a goal of 55–75% of total energy from carbohydrates…”
          These are destructive levels.

          • Sedena

            Thanks Boundless – I looked and couldn’t find the percentages on the ADA website, but I did find this under Whole Grains on the ADA website:
            “There is no end in sight to the debate as to whether grains help you lose weight, or if they promote weight gain. Even more importantly, do they help or hinder blood glucose management? One thing is for sure. If you are going to eat grain foods, pick the ones that are the most nutritious. Choose whole grains. Whole grains are rich in vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and fiber. Reading labels is essential for this food group to make sure you are making the best choices.”
            Really??? ‘There is no end in sight to the debate. . .'; ‘do they help or hinder blood glucose management. . .'; IF you are going to eat grain foods. . .’?????
            Sounds to me like the ADA is backing way off the idea that grains are essential even in their diet. I am not diabetic, but if I had that kind of equivocation in my educational materials, why on earth WOULD I eat grains at all??
            Jason, give wheat-free a try for a couple of weeks, and see what a real difference it makes in your health.

          • Jason

            I got ya, the story on this site should have said carbohydrates and not grains, since not all carbs are grains.

  14. Iris Alvares

    Hi dr Davis..
    What are the supplements you recommend we take on the wheatgrass regimen.. I live in india and hence will need to find its equivalent. I think my weight loss needs a jump start and the answer may be including some supplements. Thanks dr Davis .

    • Boundless

      > … on the wheatgrass regimen ..
      What is the “wheatgrass regimen”? Typo?
      Wheatgrass is to be avoided just like wheat.
      Modern wheat may actually be genetically closer to goatgrass, but that’s a different issue. :)

    • Neicee

      JIllOz – I was over at the Druge Report (one of which was from Pajamas Media, and they have 4-5 articles up on the same subject with our government interference in our decisions and the children that are at risk. If they can dictate to our kids, they can certainly mandate what adults will have to eat. What if we woke up tomorrow and found all recommendations by Dr. Davis, Paleo/Primal, etc. must be discarded and only those diets that conform to their whims are to be allowed? Scares the dickens out of me.

  15. Steve

    I really enjoyed reading your book. I recommended it (and your dietary guidelines) to my mother, who has struggled with her weight ever since she was a child. As your book is focused on the benefits of a wheat-free diet for overweight and diabetic people, I’m wondering if a wheat-free diet is advisable for people who are not overweight or diabetic. I have always been athletic and thin (I am 5’9″ and weigh 135 lbs) and have never had any serious health problems. Is a wheat-free diet advisable for skinny or athletic people like me who want to eat properly as “preventative maintenance” to stay in shape and healthy or is it more suitable for overweight and/or diabetic people? I went wheat-free last month and have noticed significant improvements in my strength during weight lifting workouts. I also have had less post-workout joint pain, and I no longer get “the shakes” if I don’t eat on time.

    • Rong

      “Significant improvements in my strength” “less post-workout joint pain” “no longer get the shakes when not eating on time”

      I believe you have answered your own question. Wheat is not necessary for human health. Consider how many millions of years humans lived and thrived without it.

  16. LorLor

    Is there a handy chart somewhere that shows the optimal levels for various things like triglycerides, TSH, etc.? I see them mentioned in various comments but it would be handy to have a chart listing all the best levels for the various lab tests.

  17. anthony

    Sorry to rain on ya’ll’s parade, gang, but I got back my NMR(c) results today after almost precisely one year on “Wheatbelly” and, except for triglycerides, every value was worse. I’m 74, weigh 158.5#’s with a BF% of 12% who does high intensity strength training x1 per week and japanese sword x1 per week.

    • Dr. Davis

      If you’d like an intelligent response, Anthony, then provide more details.

      If you are indeed following this approach, then a worsening of “every value” only occurs when there are unique situations present, such as the genetic pattern Apo E4, or something else has entered the picture, such as hypothyroidism, nephrotic syndrome, adrenal dysfunction, or hypogonadism.

      And the exception does not disprove the rule.

      • anthony

        Dr. Davis:

        While the exception does not disprove the rule, it is in the exceptions that additional clarity can be discovered. Here are additional data from NMR evaluated by the Raleigh NC group:

        18 months ago one week ago
        LDL-P 1451 2179**
        LDL-C 208 213**
        HDL-C 85 76**
        Trigs 65 31
        Total CH 306 295
        HDL-P 47.6 46.1**
        Small LDL-P 131 157**
        LDL Size 21.9 21.6

        LpPLA2 251 (data f/ Cleveland Clinic) 329 (data f/ Burlington NC)*********

        ** Worse
        ********** WTH???
        One solid year of Wheat Belly. The only substantive difference was a significant reduction
        in continuous motion exercise from on-the-water and Concept2 sculling secondary to
        lower back injury which has become chronic.
        BTW, I intended no disrespect with my post; just an expression of chagrin and disappointment.

        • Dr. Davis

          The most likely explanation, Anthony, is that you have a genetic pattern called Apoprotein E4.

          It means that, by eliminating wheat and minimizing junk carbohydrates, you have reduce triglycerides, reduced small LDL (the worst particle of all for heart disease) to wonderfully low levels, and have likely improved phenomena associated with blood sugar like fasting glucose and HbA1c.

          But something is entering the picture to screw up total LDL (LDL-P). This is uncommon but likely attributable to having the apo E4 genetic pattern that makes you exceptionally sensitive to fat intake.

          This is a kind of rock and hard place problem. Eliminate wheat and grains and enjoy the benefits, such as relief from acid reflux, diabetes, and small LDL particles. But it can mean over reliance on fats, which messes up apo E4-dependent phenomena.

          In brief, it means that you would do best by also limiting fats of all sorts. This is a tough pattern to deal with.

          • anthony

            Dr. Davis:
            thank you, sir, for taking the time to review my data. Your conclusion is quite concordant with the exercise physiologist with whom I do high intensity strength training. He had recommended dropping out all Palmitic acid SFA’s – and I had been eating a boatload of those puppies: heavy cream, excellent French cheeses of all sorts, fat from grass fed meat (when we could find it), you name it. He also suggested, however, continuing with and adding in SFA’s from Olive oil, avocados, etc. Perhaps I’d do well to drop those out too?

            FWIW, I have a family history of Cystic Fibrosis, and I’m recessive for the gene. My children’s mom and I lost a son to that disease 22 years ago. As you know, CF kids/adults have an enormously difficult time digesting fats – Mike was on a diet that was largely fat free, but high in protein and enough carbs to support his triathlon training. Are there any data you might be aware of that would point to the apoE4 pattern in CF families?

            And you are absolutely correct with respect to insulin sensitivity: here’s a screen excerpt from the most recent NMR:

            anthony says:
            September 25, 2012 at 3:29 pm
            Sorry to rain on ya’ll’s parade, gang, but I got back my NMR(c) results today after almost precisely one year on “Wheatbelly” and, except for triglycerides, every value was worse. I’m 74, weigh 158.5#’s with a BF% of 12% who does high intensity strength training x1 per week and japanese sword x1 per week.

            Reply
            Dr. Davis says:
            September 25, 2012 at 8:47 pm
            If you’d like an intelligent response, Anthony, then provide more details.

            If you are indeed following this approach, then a worsening of “every value” only occurs when there are unique situations present, such as the genetic pattern Apo E4, or something else has entered the picture, such as hypothyroidism, nephrotic syndrome, adrenal dysfunction, or hypogonadism.

            And the exception does not disprove the rule.

            Reply
            anthony says:
            September 26, 2012 at 9:50 am
            Dr. Davis:

            While the exception does not disprove the rule, it is in the exceptions that additional clarity can be discovered. Here are additional data from NMR evaluated by the Raleigh NC group:

            18 months ago one week ago
            LDL-P 1451 2179**
            LDL-C 208 213**
            HDL-C 85 76**
            Trigs 65 31
            Total CH 306 295
            HDL-P 47.6 46.1**
            Small LDL-P 131 157**
            LDL Size 21.9 21.6

            LpPLA2 251 (data f/ Cleveland Clinic) 329 (data f/ Burlington NC)*********

            ** Worse
            ********** WTH???
            One solid year of Wheat Belly. The only substantive difference was a significant reduction
            in continuous motion exercise from on-the-water and Concept2 sculling secondary to
            lower back injury which has become chronic.
            BTW, I intended no disrespect with my post; just an expression of chagrin and disappointment.

            Reply
            Dr. Davis says:
            September 26, 2012 at 9:55 pm
            The most likely explanation, Anthony, is that you have a genetic pattern called Apoprotein E4.

            It means that, by eliminating wheat and minimizing junk carbohydrates, you have reduce triglycerides, reduced small LDL (the worst particle of all for heart disease) to wonderfully low levels, and have likely improved phenomena associated with blood sugar like fasting glucose and HbA1c.

            But something is entering the picture to screw up total LDL (LDL-P). This is uncommon but likely attributable to having the apo E4 genetic pattern that makes you exceptionally sensitive to fat intake.

            This is a kind of rock and hard place problem. Eliminate wheat and grains and enjoy the benefits, such as relief from acid reflux, diabetes, and small LDL particles. But it can mean over reliance on fats, which messes up apo E4-dependent phenomena.

            In brief, it means that you would do best by also limiting fats of all sorts. This is a tough pattern to deal with.

  18. Gary

    Dr. Davis,

    Is there a negative correlation between type 2 diabetes and celiac disease? Can one assume that people afflicted with celiac disease, having eliminated their intake of gluten, are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes (provided they also stay away from so- called gluten-free starches)?

    • Dr. Davis

      Good question, Gary, but I don’t believe anyone has charted those data.

      I suspect you are absolutely correct, however.

  19. Allen

    Love hearing everyone’s success stories. I bought your book on July 18, and I started going wheat free July 21. At 50 years old and everything health wise was becoming borderline to high. As of 9/25 I’m down 17 lbs. My wife thinks I’ve lost enough, but I know better and am committed to staying on this lifestyle. I’ve been on a beta blocker for 3 years, and less than a year ago the doc upped my dosage. As my weight came off, my blood pressure lowered…. alot. I’ve been off my beta blocker for 2 weeks now with stable blood pressure. Also expecting the same results for a1c, previously at 6 with FBS of 98… waiting another three weeks to get it checked and see how I’m doing there. I read a study online that talked about how this type of diet causes c-reactive protein to spike up to 25%, then I noticed the tests were done in a 4 week period when people were losing weight. I think this sounds like Dr. Davis’ warning to wait until after fat loss and you are stable for 6 weeks so things more accurately reflect what is going on in your body. Thanks Doc.

  20. Mary

    Dr Davis my son is 17 and has type 1 diabetes . He eats very low carb but does eat carb smart ice cream and when we go out to eat he has fries . But my question to you is if he goes 100% WB what would happen with his diabetes . He takes 28 units of lantis once a day and uses novolog for meals and he takes less then 10 units of novolog a day (2-3 per meal ). He weighs 160 at 5’8 he is not heavy but wants to get down to 145-150 . I told him I know the less novolog he takes would help him lose is the lantis slowing his weight loss too ?
    I would like for you to tell him what he could expecto happen if he went 100% WB ,Thanks

  21. anthony

    Dear Dr. Davis:

    right you are again:
    http://primale4.wordpress.com

    And the number on my LP-IR data from my last NMR is 6, reflecting an extremely good degree of insulin sensitivity.
    For some of us, I guess you can’t have it all, eh?
    thanks again,
    tony

  22. Aaron

    I have to ask this question… I am 40 years old, 6’1″ 182 pounds at about 10% body fat… My diet is balanced and includes plenty of whole grains… I eat plenty of fruits and vegetables and lean meats as well.. I would describe my diet as balanced. I am perfectly healthy!! I do not show any of the symptoms that the latest negative trends about whole grains are receiving. So here is my question, “Can someone explain why I am so healthy eating a balanced diet that includes whole grains?” Oh Actually a second question if I may, “Am I honestly the “exception” to the new and old rules?” I have eaten this way for the past 20 years with no health issues. I exercise regularly and find that without carbohydrates (mainly whole grains) in my diet I become soft and weak. I have tried different diets out there but it seems that I am already eating the way I should be. Any comments or answers to my questions are greatly appreciated.

    • Dr. Davis

      You FEEL healthy, Aaron, but likely have multiple distortions of metabolism you are unaware of.

      For instance, if you were to run an NMR lipoprotein analysis (the test that should replace cholesterol testing), you will more than likely uncover:

      1) Excess small LDL particles, the #1 cause for heart disease
      2) Exaggerated postprandial markers–e.g., excess VLDL, IDL, due to the process of hepatic de novo lipogenesis in response to grains
      3) Higher levels of HbA1c than ideal due to the extravagant high blood sugar potential of grains

      Also, note that many problems with consumption of modern wheat don’t make their appearance until, one day, you notice that you are wetting yourself, or have unexplained acid reflux symptoms, or pain in your knees–i.e., all the chronic problems of “aging” but really representing, to a large degree, the chronic long-term destructive consequences of grain consumption.

      • Aaron

        “Also, note that many problems with consumption of modern wheat don’t make their appearance until, one day, you notice that you are wetting yourself, or have unexplained acid reflux symptoms, or pain in your knees–i.e., all the chronic problems of “aging” but really representing, to a large degree, the chronic long-term destructive consequences of grain consumption.”

        I find it frightening for a doctor to make a statement like “chronic problems of aging” AGING IS A PROCESS NOT A PROBLEM. If I am lucky, I will live long enough to feel my heart give out, not because it has a “problem” but because it was built to stop. So it seems you and all of the gluten/wheat/grain free people have found the holy grail, the fountain of youth! I better eliminate wheat/grain out of my diet immediately then so that I too can enjoy a life without aging “problems.”
        Are these the aging “problems” you speak of:
        An overall decrease in energy and vigor, The tendency to become easily tired
        Changes in sleeping patterns, Decreased memory, Behavioral changes,
        Skin and hair changes such as wrinkles, brown spots on the skin, loss of skin elasticity, and hair loss affecting the limbs, Changes in hair color, A loss or decrease in vision and hearing, Changes in bowel function, Decrease in libido, Sexual dysfunction, Urinary problems such as incontinence, dribbling, and changes in frequency of urination, Changes in menstrual cycle, Abdominal obesity and inability to lose weight .
        Sooner or later, many people develop one or more of the degenerative diseases of aging, such as: Alzheimer’s disease, Stroke, Heart attack, Cancer, Osteoporosis, Diabetes Mellitus, Parkinson’s disease, Arthritis,Cataracts,Glaucoma and Hearing loss.
        The list above was googled and describes some of the effects of the aging process. If people want to be brainwashed into believing this process will stop as a result of eliminating whole grains for ones diet, then may God help us all.

        I found the answer to my questions by doing a search on Amazon.com for diet books…. the search came back with 73,290 diet books. 73,290 claims to the truth… We are so clueless.

        • James

          Hello Aaron,

          Nobody forces you to change anything, It is a personal choice. If you feel healthy, then enjoy it.

          I also thought I was healthy, never was obese or anything particularly worrisome. However, I did eventually notice a few things that I was so accustomed to that it took a while to connect the dots. I started to remove a few things from my diet but from learning more here and there, I decided to make it lifestyle and embrace some kind of “paleo” diet.
          After 3 weeks, I feel so great that I can now fully measure the extent of the issues I started to notice a while ago.

          But coming back to you, my question is: why are you coming here ? Are you seeking some advice or have a particular eating issue ? It does not look like it after having read you. You just come to challenge Dr Davis in order to reveal some potential contradiction. You know, you don’t need to buy a book to experiment on things. I have not bought his book, nor do I intend to, I have no need of it. But I recognize on myself the genuine truth behind the WF message. This message is for free and only you can decide whether or not it is worth trying.

          • Aaron

            Hello James,
            I am not challenging anything. I have asked the same question on many websites. I want to know the medical opinion of my balanced diet that includes Whole Grains. Am I an anomaly in general population, from a health standpoint? If you read my original post, I asked Dr. Davis, “If I am an exception to this new WF trend.” Dr. Davis, without even knowing who I am or asking any questions, assumed that I only “FEEL” healthy. I will not place all my medical records on this website as some others have elected to do, but I can tell you that I am also “clinically healthy” as well.

            James, you stated, “But I recognize on myself the genuine truth behind the WF message.” That is great and I am happy for you… but what I originally asked Dr. Davis is essentially this, “what makes me so different that I can eat whole wheat grains without any medical conditions?”

            Dr. Davis never answered my question ,but instead assumed (as now you have) that I have no idea what “FEELING/BEING HEALTHY” is. Dr. Davis condescendingly is the one who challenged my authority on my own health without even knowing me!!! That is why I defended myself the way I did. How would you like to take your car to mechanic only for him to tell you that your engine is blown or about to blow without even looking at it!! I’m sure because the mechanic did not go to medical school, you would automatically render him a quack, but when an M.D. type makes these assumptions about your health, it’s okay?

        • Dr. Davis

          No, Aaron: I fear that YOU are clueless.

          Or, at the very least, brainwashed by the forces who hope that you will become victim to Big Food and Big Pharma.

          Perhaps you should come back in 5 or 10 years, equipped with your list of 2, 4, or 10 drugs, all prescribed because your doctor advised you to “eat more healthy whole grains” and treat you by the conventional guidelines for hypertension, blood sugar, and “high cholesterol.”

          For the present, I count you among the victims of this system gone awry.

  23. This lesson is given me the best way to cure using Wheat Belly. Really!! It is totally informative and cool. I really love to visit here everyday!
    Thanks